Solr: Replication not starting?

After upgrading our Solr-servers from 1.4.1 to 4.0-trunk (to be sure we were ready for the next version), I had trouble with getting replication to start again. It worked perfectly back with 1.4.1, but after upgrading to 4.0-trunk, it simply wouldn’t start.

I had to upgrade the machines individually (to allow the current index to continue serve requests), I removed the replication and then directed all the traffic to the slave. After updating the master (which worked after actually remembering to clean out the old webapps from Tomcat and adding a few new settings) and reindexing, most of the traffic were directed to it, and the slave were upgraded to the new Solr-version. I turned on replication again, updated the configuration file with the needed settings and started the slave. Nothing happened. Weird.

Time to debug!

On any slaves there’s a “replication.properties” file in the data directory ($SOLRHOME/data) which contain information about the current replication status. This file were created, indicating that at least the replication was attempting to run. If you open the file in a text editor (or just cat it), you should be able to read a bit of meta information about the replication state.

replicationFailedAtList=1311072270004,1311072240006..
timesFailed=11

Seems like it’s trying, but for some reason it doesn’t work. First thing to check would be to grep for replication in the log on both the master and the slave, and see if there’s any requests being made at all. There might be, but the replication still doesn’t start.

Try fetching the current state yourself to see what response the master is serving. You can do this by using “GET” or “wget” or “curl” to make an HTTP request to the master Solr-server from the slave together with the URL from “masterUrl” in the requestHandler for /replication from solrconfig.xml:

GET http://example.com/solr/replication?command=indexversion

This should respond with something close to:



  
    0
    0
  
  1310994445934
  2

If “indexversion” is 0, this means that the master hasn’t triggered a replication yet, which may seem weird if you’ve just started the server and the slave doesn’t have any data at all.

The reason might be that the master has not been instructed to actually trigger a replication event (and unless a replication event has been triggered, the indexversion will be 0):


  
    commit
    startup
    optimize

If you only have “commit” in the above list, a replication event will not be triggered unless you’ve actually performed a commit after the slave has connected for the first time. If you add “startup”, the replication will also be triggered when the master starts up (so that any connecting slaves will start replicating right away).

To fix the issue without restarting any nodes, issue a single commit to the master and watch as the slaves start replicating. To issue a commit through curl:

curl http://example.com/solr/update -H "Content-Type: text/xml" --data-binary ''

nginx and rewriting based on GET-parameter (URL-parameters/arguments)

When rewriting URLs in Apache through mod_rewrite, you have the possibility of using RewriteCond to only apply rewrites if the original resource has been called with a particular argument in the URL (such as “/file?oid=..”).

The solution in nginx was however a bit different, but thanks to Rewriting URL-params in nginx I got on the right track from the start.

In nginx this information is available through the $args variable, which will contain the complete query string. In Will’s example above he’ll replace the query string, but I were interested in inserting a specific parameter instead (and include the previous query string, so I couldn’t just do the “set $args ..” that he does in the example).

My first try was to simply use $1 in the rewrite destination, but this didn’t work – as rewrite will reset the captured patterns from the previous regular expression (since the rewrite source also is a regular expression). But by introducing my own, temporary variable I were able to save the value from the matching regular expression (for the GET parameter) and use it in my rewrite destination.

The following example shows how I ended up solving the issue. This will rewrite the URL only if the “oid” parameter is found at the beginning of the query string when the URL is requested, and the location = /oldURL limits the rewrite to requests for the old resource.

location = /oldURL {
    if ($args ~ "^oid=(\d+)") {
        set $key1 $1;
        rewrite ^.*$  /newURL?param1=foo¶m2=bar&key1=$key1 last;
    }
}

This will rewrite a request for /oldURL?oid=123&what=cheese to /newURL?param1=foo&param2=bar&key1=123&oid=123&what=cheese — if you want to exclude the previous arguments, you can either just set $args directly to key1=$1 and just use param1=foo and param2=bar in the rewrite destination:

        set $args key1=$1;
        rewrite ^.*$  /newURL?param1=foo¶m2=bar last;

This might be cleaner, depending on what you’re trying to do.

SEVERE: Error in xpath:java.lang.RuntimeException: solrconfig.xml missing luceneMatchVersion

One of the things that changed from Solr 1.4.1 to 1.5+ was the introduction of a parameter to tell Solr / Lucene which kind of compability version its index files should be created and used in.

Solr now refuses to start if you do not provide this setting (if you’re upgrading a previous installation from 1.4.1 or earlier). The fix isn’t really straight forward, and you’ll probably have to recreate your index files if you’re just arriving at the scene with Solr / Lucene 3.2 and 4.0. Solr 3.0 (1.5) might be able to upgrade the files from the 2.9 version, but if you’re jumping from Lucene 2.9 to 4.0, the easiest solution seems to be to delete the current index and reindex (set up replication, disable replication from the master, query the slave while reindexing the master, etc.. and you’ll have no downtime while doing this!).

You’ll need to add a parameter to your solrconfig.xml file as well in the <config> section.

LUCENE_CURRENT 

Other valid values are LUCENE_30, LUCENE_31, LUCENE_32 and LUCENE_40. These values represent specific versions of the index structure, while LUCENE_CURRENT will use the version depending on which particular release of Lucene you’re using. The version format will be upgraded automagically between most releases, so you’ll probably be fine by using LUCENE_CURRENT. If you however are trying to load index files that are more than one version older, you may have to use one of the other values. If you want to avoid any possible surprises when updating your Solr installation, you probably want to set this to one of the versioned values.

Updating a Solr Analysis Plugin from 1.4.1 (Lucene 2.9) to Solr / Lucene 4.0 (current trunk)

Three years and a couple of weeks ago I wrote a post about how to get started writing a simple Solr Analysis Plugin to handle incoming tokens and modifying them in place when an update is requested.

Since then the whole version number structure of Solr has changed (and is now in sync with the underlying Lucene version), and not surprisingly, the current API has also been updated. This means that a few small changes are required to get your analysis plugins running on the current trunk of Lucene and Solr.

The main change is that the previously named TermAttribute is now named CharTermAttribute, this means that any imports will have to change:

- import org.apache.lucene.analysis.tokenattributes.TermAttribute; 
+ import org.apache.lucene.analysis.tokenattributes.CharTermAttribute; 

Any declarations of TermAttributes will need to be CharTermAttributes instead:

- private TermAttribute termAtt; 
+ private CharTermAttribute termAtt; 
  public NorwegianNameFilter(TokenStream input) 
  { 
      super(input); 
-     termAtt = (TermAttribute) addAttribute(TermAttribute.class); 
+     termAtt = input.getAttribute(CharTermAttribute.class); 
  } 

We now fetch the attribute from the current TokenStream (not sure if the old way I did it has been deprecated, but this seems to be the suggested way now). We also change any references to TermAttribute.class to CharTermAttribute.class.

The actual TermAttribute interface has also changed, meaning we’ll have to change a few of the old method calls:

- termAtt.setTermLength(this.parseBuffer(termAtt.termBuffer(), termAtt.termLength())); 
+ termAtt.setLength(this.parseBuffer(termAtt.buffer(), termAtt.length())); 

.setTermLength() => .setLength()
.termBuffer => .buffer()
.termLength => .length()

The methods will behave in the same manner as in the previous API, .buffer() will retrieve a char array (char[]) which is the current buffer of the actual term which can you modify in place, while length() and setLength() retrieves the current length of the buffer (the buffer can be larger than the part used) and sets the new length of the buffer (if you’re collapsing characters).

The new implementation of our analysis filter skeleton:

package no.derdubor.solr.analysis;

import java.io.IOException;
import org.apache.lucene.analysis.Token;
import org.apache.lucene.analysis.TokenFilter;
import org.apache.lucene.analysis.TokenStream;
import org.apache.lucene.analysis.tokenattributes.CharTermAttribute;

public class NorwegianNameFilter extends TokenFilter
{
    private CharTermAttribute termAtt;

    public NorwegianNameFilter(TokenStream input)
    {
        super(input);
        termAtt = input.getAttribute(CharTermAttribute.class);
    }

    public boolean incrementToken() throws IOException
    {
        if (this.input.incrementToken())
        {
            termAtt.setLength(this.parseBuffer(termAtt.buffer(), termAtt.length()));
            return true;
        }
        
        return false;
    }
    
    protected int parseBuffer(char[] buffer, int bufferLength)
    {

    }
}